Posts for: January, 2013

By Chapman & Owens, D.D.S., PLLC
January 15, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tooth-ColoredFillings-DoTheyReallyLookNatural

While the goal of restorative dentistry is to return all of the destroyed or lost dental tissues of the teeth to full form (shape) and function, when you blend this goal with the artistry of cosmetic dentistry, the results can be dazzling. Today's modern techniques and materials enable replacement of missing tooth structure that allows bonding directly to the tooth so that it not only is an exact color match but also actually strengthens the tooth. And tooth-colored fillings are not just for front teeth. They can dramatically improve the appearance of all teeth — even your back molars — so that it appears you've never had tooth decay at all!

All of this is accomplished through the use of either tooth-colored dental porcelain or composite resins. Porcelains are a form of ceramic material formed by the action of heat. They are available in many colors and shades made from a powder corresponding to the primary color of the natural tooth structure that is mixed with water and placed into an oven for firing (hence their ceramic nature). When built up in layers by highly trained dental ceramicists, they can be made to mimic the exact natural translucency, staining and contours of tooth enamel.

Dental composite resins are the most common materials used for tooth-colored adhesive restorations today and have properties similar to tooth structure. They consist of resin or special plastics and fillers that are made of silica, a form of glass. The fillers give the composites wear resistance and translucency (see through properties).

It is important to note that besides providing the appearance of beautiful teeth, properly restored teeth function and wear better. But most important to you, they appear indistinguishable from natural teeth! Furthermore, scientific studies and clinical experience have validated their use as both safe and predictable. In fact, these techniques are also suitable for children's teeth and can incorporate fluoride to reduce decay. Together, all of these changes have so significantly impacted the way modern dentistry is practiced that many believe we may have entered into the so-called “post-amalgam (silver metal-colored dental fillings) era.”

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about tooth-colored fillings. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth Colored Fillings.”


By Chapman & Owens, D.D.S., PLLC
January 05, 2013
Category: Oral Health
GoodOralHygieneMadeAlltheDifferenceforBallroomDanceStarCherylBurke

Growing up with a dentist stepdad, Cheryl Burke of Dancing with the Stars heard a lot over the years about the importance of good oral hygiene — in particular, the benefits of using dental floss.

“My dad would say, ‘make sure you floss,’ but I never really listened to him. I was very, very stubborn,” Cheryl told Dear Doctor magazine recently in an exclusive interview. Cheryl admits this stubbornness took its toll, in the form of tooth decay. “I definitely had my share of cavities,” Cheryl recalled.

Cavities can form when food particles, particularly sugar and carbohydrates, are not effectively cleaned from the spaces between teeth. These particles are then broken down by bacteria naturally present in the mouth, resulting in the production of acids that attack the tooth enamel.

When she reached her twenties, Cheryl decided she really needed to step up her oral hygiene and cultivate an asset so important to a professional dancer: a beautiful smile. And once she did, cavities became a distant memory.

“I think when you do floss frequently, it helps to reduce the chances of getting cavities,” Cheryl said. “It took me a while to figure it out.” Now Cheryl flosses after every meal. “I carry floss with me wherever I go. I have no shame busting out my floss in the middle of a restaurant!” She declared.

Dental decay is actually a worldwide epidemic, especially among kids. Untreated, it can lead to pain, tooth loss, and, because it is an infectious disease, it may even have more serious systemic (whole body) health consequences. The good thing is that it is entirely preventable through good oral hygiene at home and regular professional cleanings here at the office.

If it has been a while since you or your children have seen us for a cleaning and check-up, or you just want to learn more about preventing tooth decay, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation. If you would like to read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Cheryl Burke, please see “Cheryl Burke.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Tooth Decay: The World's Oldest & Most Widespread Disease.”




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